A wine for each can of preserves

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They are always there. In some lonely house drawer, or in our pantry. They are a fast solution when we are very hungry or when do we receive an unexpected visit. I am taking about tin cans. For years they,  have been underestimated perhaps for being too practical and for their mundane presence in all the houses, but for a while their quality has been improving  and they have become in some cases true objects of desire.

Not long ago  I read an article on tin cans in the Spanish newspaper, El Mundo. The title was: Latas de conserva: de comida de subsistencia a producto de culto. In english, it means: Tin Cans: from subsistence fare to cult products. The article explains well the high quality and almost artisanal aspect of the Spanish tin industry. I highly recommend that you read it. Having lived in Spain, I can corroborate this fact. You can find amazing preserves for 3 or 5 euros.

In the last few years, the popularity of high quality tin cans has exploded in Quebec, Canada. From every hipster restaurant from Au pied du Cochon to Le Vin Papillon and Maison Publique, you see on the menu a plate consisting of a conserve or two. However, it was not all the times like this.

In my recollection when I came to Montreal in 1994, there were maybe 2 or 3 fine grocery stores where you could gourmet tin cans. I used and still  go on a regular basis to la Libreria Espanola, where they have an excellent selection of Spanish Tin Cans.  Les Douceurs du Marche in the Atwater market has some good stuff as well.

Wines and Tin Cans.

The combinations are endless , due mainly to the wide range of products and flavors of the preserves, and to the great variety of  Spanish wines of  premium quality that we enjoy today in the Canadian market.

For clams and mussels, I like different whites such as Marqués de Cáceres Verdejo Rueda 2015 ( SAQ # 12861609, $14.00. LCBO VINTAGES #: 461400, $14.95) or Paco & Lola Albarino 2015 ( SAQ # 12475353, $17.20. LCBO VINTAGES #: 350041)

For the fish and seafood preserves that involve some type of sauce, I will choose an intense and aromatic Verdejo such as El gordo del Circo ( SAQ # 12748171, $20.95. LCBO VINTAGES # 441220, $17.95). With sardines and sardinillas, I will choose a wonderful rosado such as Torres Vina Esmeralda 2016 ( SAQ # 13204803, $17.00. LCBO VINTAGES # 490920. $13.95.

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What about anchovies?

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Txakolis, would be muy first choice of wine when to drink with anchovies. Sadly, there is very little in Canada and the tiny amounts are only available in private imports.  With anchoas en conservas, I will go  for La Gitana Manzanilla ( SAQ # 12284039, $22.05. LCBO VINTAGES#: 745448, $16.95 for 500 ml. The pungent and umami like flavours of the anchovies would compliment nicely the briny and chalky notes of  La Gitana.

Asparagus and Artichokes.

 

For me, it is hearsay talk is difficult to match wine with the abvove two vegetables.  For the delicates flavours of the Asparagus, I would choose a Baron de Ley 2016 ( SAQ # 10357572, $14.30). A mostly monovarietal Viura, with its non intrusive floral and citric notes will not disturb the delicate notes of the asparagus.

For the picky artichoke, the perfect partner would be another  manzanilla. This time, I would choose the Gonzalez Byass Tio Pepe Extra Dry ( SAQ # 00242669, $19.45, LCBO #  231829, $17.95. A lovely wine that displays notes of green almonds, tobacco with green apple peel.

Whate are some of your experiences matching preserves and wine?

 

 

 

 

What wines to have with Gazpacho?

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Slowly but surely, it is getting warmer in Quebec. Just this week on Wednesday, it was 31 Celsius. I was not in the mood to cook so I told my wife to cook supper. She ended up doing some burgers that were quite tasty.

My point being that nobody wants to be near a stove when is hot outside. Also, there is something about the heat that makes you feel deliciously lazy. In a hot summer day, I will salads, fish carpaccios or ceviche and of course a nice bowl of Gazpacho!!.

Basically, a gazpacho is a cold Spanish soup coming from the land of Flamenco and Tapas, Andalusia.  This is such a simple, tasty and inexpensive dish, that’s why it has become so popular.

Gazpacho goes way back to pre-Roman times when shepherds where sustained by the original version that consisted of stale bread, garlic, vinegar, oil and water. With the advent of agriculture, vegetables were incorporated.

Popular across Spain, I have had amazing gazpacho in Madrid, Barcelona and Valencia. However, it taste better in his home of Andalusia, the land of good flamenco that comprises Sevilla, Granada, Costa del Sol and Jerez country. In this land of scorching heat, the Andalusians have been making cool magic potions for a long time.

According to Alicia Rios and Lourdes March, authors of Spanish cookbooks, Gazpacho became popular thanks to the marketing efforts of Eugenia de Montijo, the wife of the French Emperor Napoleon III in the nineteenth century. Gazpacho was unknown, or little known, in the north of Spain before about 1930.

At its heart, though, gazpacho’s fundamentals are consistent: It’s a cold soup based on tomatoes, with cucumber, onion and green bell pepper as customary supporting players. The addition of bread is much more European, and evokes a culinary link with Tuscan panzanella (“bread salad”), which could be irreverently described as a chunky Italian gazpacho too thick to drink. Other versions involve the use of watermelons and there is even a white Gazpacho. This last one is made with ground almonds, pine nuts, garlic and lima beans.

If you happen to be in Madrid, do not hesitate to visit the resto Clarita. They make an amazing watermelon gazpacho plus they have other goodies such an amazing red tuna and the seafood is amazingly fresh all the times.

Look for crisp whites and fruity roses to accompany your Gazpacho. These wines have the ability to handle the pungent acidity of the vinegar in the soup and will not overwhelm the delicate vegetable flavors.

Must try wines with Gazpacho

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Vina Ijalba Aloque Rosado 2015 ( $17.20. Private Import in Quebec, Charton Hobbs )

A 100% tempranillo rose from the leading organic winery in Rioja. Lovely notes of raspberries, strawberries and floral nuances. On the mouth, medium body, fresh with a delicate balance. Pairing nicely with tomato Gazpacho.

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Laguna de Nava Tempranillo Rosado 2016. SAQ Depot # 12238008. $11.65

Easy going red berry fruit with fragrant peach notes. In the mouth, simple yet with very fragant flavors at a friendly price. Pair it with a watermelon based Gazpacho.

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Bodegas Marañones Picarana 2014. SAQ # 13206841. $24.45

A 100% albillo from the upcoming Vinos de Madrid appellation. On the nose, ripe orchard fruit with dried herbs and spices. On the palate, it is tasty, fruity, with good acidity and well-balanced. Pair it with a garlic white gazpacho.

 

 

Keep hydrated with Rosado!!!

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This week in Montreal, the temperature went up to a warm 40 C. I really enjoy when is hot like this. Its mandatory at this weather to go the pool and to drink lots of cold rose. You want to keep your body cool and fresh and not risk dehydration.

As you know, Spain has an amazing selection of roses. From the floral rosados of Navarra to the gutsy ones of Valencia, there is something for every palate. However, our selection at the SAQ is kind of weak. Here are my reccomendations to keep you hydrated.

Borsao Rosado Seleccion 2015. SAQ Code: 10754201. $13.20

A regular in the SAQ catalog, this rose made from 100% Garnacha, displays aromas of strawberry jam and cherry. Full body and easy going, it is the perfect refresment by the side of the pool. 87/100.

Vincente Gandia Pescaito joven 2015. SAQ Depot: 12841093. $10.00

Gandia is one of the biggest wine conglomerates in Spain. This rosado is made from Bobal and Cabernet Sauvignon. It has a nose bringing to mind fieldberries with a touch of violet. On the mouth, full body, medium acidity with simple but delicious vinous flavors. Great for the everyday BBQ. 88/100

Codorniu Castell de Raimat Costers del Segre 2015. SAQ Code: 12842344. $14.30

Elegant notes of strawberry, with  a hint of grapefruit complemented with a touch of aniseed. On the mouth,   flavors are reminiscent of strawberry and raspberry with a sweet finale. In fact, there is some residual sugar in this wine. 86/100

Felix Solis-Los Molinos Tempranillo 2015. SAQ Code: 10791125. $9.40

On the nose, delicate aromas of raspberries, watermelon and other red berry fruit. On the mouth, fresh and delicate. Flavors are consistent with the nose. Perfect for raw tomato pasta based sauces. 85/100