In the mood of Rias Baixas with Lobster

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Source:  http://kednycuisine.com/

This morning, I woked up with an incredible thirst to have a few bottles of  Rias Baixas with Langosta a la Parrilla. Living in Quebec, soon I will be getting my fix of the queen of the crustaceans.

When I think of eating Lobster, all I need is a nice Albarino. When made in the Galician wine region of Rias Baixas, often displays an echo of salinity from the nearby Atlantic, with different tones of floral notes, citrus, stone and tropical fruits. Plus, a Rias Baixas offers a very crisp  acidity, medium body and low alcohol.

Rías Baixas boasts a number of high-quality grapes. Albarino is king with a lion share of more than 90% of the DO’s vineyard area. It is said  to be related to Riesling, and some wine scholars argue that it was brought to the area by pilgrims or monks on their way to the  medieval town of Santiago de Compostela. Albarino is often blended with Treixadura or Loureira.

The soils are mostly granite, with a little bit of  chalk and clay. The bounty of the earth  offers a stream of  minerals with little nutrients, making it ideal for viticulture. The slopes encourage good drainage, a very important factor considering the high amount of rain, the area gets.  The neighboring Atlantic Ocean provides not only rain but also humidity, so growers have traditionally favored trellising their vines with pergolas, allowing air to circulate around the grapes, therefore sanitizing the grapes.  Fortunately, late summer is usually the driest part of the year, providing ideal ripening conditions for harvest in October. The grapes are pampered here.

Bodegas Terras Gauda,  are making some extraordinarily good wines from the local Rias Baixas grapes. As well as famous albariño grape, they use loureiro (also found in Portugal’s Vinho Verde just a little further south), and intriguingly, they have taken the near-extinct caiño grape to their hearts,to preserve this disappearing local white variety.

 

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The 2016 is impressive on the palate due to its powerful structure. Youthful with a great character. On the mouth, it is quite aromatic and exuberant with citrus aromas of mandarin orange and grapefruit, ripe peach and pineapple, and additional nuances of orange blossom, mint and thyme.  This is a serious wine for a serious shellfish. It retails for $24.25 in the Quebec market (10858351).

If you cannot get your hands in a bottle of Gauda, try Albarino Valminor or Pazo de Senorans, they are good alternatives as well. Lobster has a delicate flavor and should be matched with a wine which compliments and accentuates its sweet, succulent nature. That’s why I think a Rias Baixas is a natural partner: Imposing but not oververhemling.

If you want to know how to grill a lobster, here is a very simple video that describes the task. It may seem complicate, but is quite easy. All you need is a good knife, a bit of dexterity and a nice lobster.

Salud!!!!

 

Spanish Albarino, what you must drink in 2016

Since my first visit to Rías Baixas back in 2003 have consistently loved its Albariño wines. While some of the wines are definitely better than others, I can honestly say that I have never tasted a bad wine.

The Albariño grape is an easy grape variety to love. In my view it appeals both to the new or occasional wine drinker as much as it does to the exploring wine passionate.

Vineyards in the beautiful Rias Baixas appellation

For my readers new with Albariño, it is a white grape indigenous to Rías Baixas. Its  taste and texture, is like a crossover between the crisp, refreshing acidity and citrus aromas of a Riesling, with the stony fruit aromas of a Pinot Grigio, and a florality element that brings to mind  a Viognier. This is the reason that it is must white wine that you must drink in 2016. It has a bit of everything.

According to the producer, vintage and vineyard site, Albariño wines could be light to medium to full body. Most of them are made in the  unoaked style, with some producers giving them oak aging and a new tendency is appearing  to make orange wine from the grape.

For some time now Galician winemakers have been experimenting with storing their Albarinos underwater. This practice has many advantages such as absence of light, a constant cool temperature, high pressure, and the gentle rocking motion of the waves.You can see in the video above this practice.  This crew of TVE interviewed famed flying Spanish winemaker back in 2010.

Albariño with fish and seafood are interwoven in the gastronomical culture of Spain have You wont go wrong if you serve Albariño with simple grilled or white fish, mussels shellfish, oysters and so on. It is also a good companion with Thai and Japanese cuisine. I also enjoy it with pastas in light cream sauce.

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Here are some Albarinos from Rias Baixas that I tried in the latest La Grande Degustation back in November. The wines come from the portfolio of Selections Oeno which has some very interesting producers in their portfolio.

Genio y Figura 2014. D.O Rias Baixas. $21.90 CDN. Private Import. Selections Oeno

Very fresh nose. Simple but delicious minerality with peach undertones. On the mouth, medium body with a creamy texture and fresh acidity. Retronasal flavors remind me of dry chives, lemon zest and mountain herbs. The perfect wine for seared scallops  and pasta. 93\100.

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Xion Rias Baixas 2014. D.O Rias Baixas. $19.80 CDN. SAQ Code:  12485543.

On the nose, an emblematic that brings to mind white cranberries, plums with a hint of quince and green apple. On the mouth, very fresh with a marked minerality in the palate. Crisp with a fragant and aromatic finale. Must be lovely with jumbo prawns with fleur de sel. 93\100.

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Attis Blanc 2014. D.O Rias Baixas. $21.90 CDN. Private Import. Selections Oeno

Lovely nose that brings to mind fresh nectarines and apricots as well an underlying minerality. On the mouth, medium body. fresh and balanced with delicate white flowers flavors. White licorice, jazmin leaves come to mind. 93\100. Will pair nicely with mild Thai seafood dishes.

Sitta laranxa

Sittia Larantxa Orange wine 2014. Price: $29.25 CDN. Private Import. Selections Oeno.

Emblematic nose revealing honey with confit citric fruits. Floral nuances. Overall very perfumed. Exotic fruit aromas as well such as Papaya dessert. On the mouth, medium to full body. Fresh with earthy notes that bring to mind, earth and amber. Long aromatic finale. 90\100. To drink by its own or with the cheese course

 

Empanada Gallega, Octopus and Albarino

On today’s post, I will discuss 2 Galician dishes that can be matched with one of the greatest Spanish grapes, Albarino. One of the most beautiful aspects of wine drinking is that you can match the wines with the regional foods where the wine come from.

An empanada galicia is a large, pie-shaped  hails from Galicia, Spain. Galicia is  an “autonomous community” within Spain, with its own language – Galician. They first appeared in Medieval Iberia during the time of the Moorish invasions. A cookbook published in Catalan in 1520 mentions empanadas filled with seafood among its recipes of Catalan, Italian, French, and Arabian food. It is believed that empanadas and the very similar calzones are both related from the Arabic meat-filled pies, samosas

Any empanada recipe can be prepared in the shape of a pie, and might be called an “empanada gallega”, but the Spanish version has certain unique characteristics. Empanadas are in, Spain, Portugal, the Caribbean, Latin America, and the Philippines,a type of stuffed pastry.The name comes from the Spanish verb empanar, meaning to wrap or coat in bread.

The dough of a Galician empanada is slightly different than typical Latin American-style empanada one, as it is made with olive oil and yeast. The Spanish traditional filling is a delicious mix of onions, bell peppers, tomatoes, tuna, and might include hardboiled eggs, and seasoned with smoky pimenton paprika. The empanada is often baked in a paella pan, thought you can also do it in a pizza pan.

Pulpo a la gallega -Galician style octopus- is a century old recipe,  because octopus has been consumed in this autonomous region for longer than we can count. Octopus was one of the few types of seafood that was transported from the coasts to the interior towns and in fact it was far more appreciated in the interior than near the sea.

When America was discovered many products appeared in the Spanish gastronomy, including a  spice obtained from some crushed red chiles , in Spanish they call it pimentón, in English: paprika.

Not only does paprika give a tempting reddish tinge, but it was also great for preserving food in those time before frozen products and easy land transportation were available.

But it wasn’t until a few years later that pulpo a la gallega became and actual dish. Some 125 years ago, when muleteers went to cattle fairs, they bought large amounts of octopus and then they’d prepare it with olive oil and paprika. Quite simple.

The name in galician for pulpo a la gallega is “pulpo a feira” (fair style octopus) for a very simple reason. During the cattle fairs the farmers would buy or sell cattle, sell their farm products, etc, and buy groceries such as salt, sugar and other products they didn’t have daily access to.

The trip to the town where the fair took place took a long time and most people would stay for lunch or dinner. Those who stayed near the fair venue could eat octopus (as we’ve mentioned before, it was a very typical dish in fairs).

The “pulpeiras” (specialized in octopus) would cook the animal in copper cauldrons and serve it in wooden plates. It is said that the copper pot gives it an incomparable taste that it’s impossible to obtain with any other material.

Wines for these Spanish delicacies:

Voir la photo agrandie du produit. Cette photo s'ouvre dans une visionneuse et peut comporter des obstacles à l'accessibilité.

Pazo de Senorans Albarino 2013. SAQ Code: 00898411. Price: $27.30

On the nose, medium intensity aromas of lemon,green apple, and diverse stone fruits. In addition, diverse  floral notes such as acacia. In the mouth, mineral driven with pear like flavors alike. Fresh, firm and with a racy finale. 90\100

Voir la photo agrandie du produit. Cette photo s'ouvre dans une visionneuse et peut comporter des obstacles à l'accessibilité.

Terras Gauda O Rosal 2014. SAQ Code: 10858351. Price: $24.00

On the nose the wine displays a generous nose of ripe peach with aromatic hints of bay leaf, mint, orange blossom, tangerine  and orange peel. On the palate it displays lots of  character  with a classic body and sensational fruitiness. Succulent and dense, it shines with  an elegant creamy sensation. 92\100

Have a good week!!

Sip on this-Albariño and Oysters.

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I recently was invited by a friend of mine to an Oyster party. This is the kind of venue, where a group of people ( 20 in this case ), get together for a debauchery on this mollusc. Since I rarely eat oysters, it was a magnificent opportunity to taste them and to stuff myself on them. Yes…, i am not shy to say that.

Me, when it come to oysters, the spanish wine that comes to mind is Albariño. This white grape comes from Galicia, in northwestern Spain. It accounts for 90% of the grape production in the area. One theory regardings its origin, states that Albariño is related Riesling, introduced by German pilgrims on the path to Santiago de Compostela, a holy city in Galicia. Another  expanation to its origin is that it was the Cistercian monks from Burgundy, who established vineyards wherever they built their churches, introduced it in the 12th or 13th century. 

While you may, once in a while ,  drink an albariño from Portugal called Alvarinho in poftuguese, the true home of the grape is Galicia in the Rias Biaxas appellation of northwest Spain.  This terroir benefits from its proximity to the Mino River and more so, the Atlantic to the west which keeps the temperature cooler in the summer and milder in the winter than inland regions.  While there are five subregions, the Condado do Tea and Val do Salnes tend to produce the best Albarino.

Albarino grape (and wine), for me, is at its very best in the unadulterated form:  unoaked and single variety.  That offers the best of its true expression:  clean, acid driven with lively citrus notes and refreshing minerality.

I am a strong believer of wine and regional food. The heart of Albarino production lies on the northeast Iberian coast, the same region from which the majority fresh seafood such as crab, octopus and scallops is resourced.  The spiny acidity, citrus profile and low alcohol content of Albarino is an ideal match for the sweetness of the seafood whether served whole, as a tapas, or accented with regional spice such as Spanish paprika (pimenton), or lemon, lemongrass or lemon verbena.   With fresh seafood so abundant, it’s easy to dive into a tangy, citrusy dish of cerviche, fish crudo, or fresh lemon accented fish carpaccio of salmon or tuna. It is to die with our Canadian oysters.

Fried foods love clean and refreshing wines to cut through the crust and Albarino is a wonderful pairing wines, especially if you’re looking for dry citrus notes.  Asian dishes such as sushi and richer dishes such as seafood stew, casseroles of chicken, sausage and pork are fun pairings. 

Here is the tasting notes from the albariño that i had at the Oyster festival. It comes from  Adegas/Bodegas Valminor, a modest family winery in the Rias Baixas. They collaborate with 200 winegrowers in the Rias Baixas appellation and they have the latest technology in winemaking equipment. This wine has an excellent price for the quality that delivers and i highly reccomend it for the holidays that are coming

Valminor Albarino 2012 Code SAQ :  11667759. $17.65

Beautiful golden colour. In the nose, intense ripe citric fruit profile wrapped up in a thin foil of minerality. In the mouth, medium body. Very fresh with a tangy acidity. Savoury with a long persistance recalling the  briny flavours of the sea. Perfect match with oysters. 93/100