Sip on this-Albariño and Oysters.

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I recently was invited by a friend of mine to an Oyster party. This is the kind of venue, where a group of people ( 20 in this case ), get together for a debauchery on this mollusc. Since I rarely eat oysters, it was a magnificent opportunity to taste them and to stuff myself on them. Yes…, i am not shy to say that.

Me, when it come to oysters, the spanish wine that comes to mind is Albariño. This white grape comes from Galicia, in northwestern Spain. It accounts for 90% of the grape production in the area. One theory regardings its origin, states that Albariño is related Riesling, introduced by German pilgrims on the path to Santiago de Compostela, a holy city in Galicia. Another  expanation to its origin is that it was the Cistercian monks from Burgundy, who established vineyards wherever they built their churches, introduced it in the 12th or 13th century. 

While you may, once in a while ,  drink an albariño from Portugal called Alvarinho in poftuguese, the true home of the grape is Galicia in the Rias Biaxas appellation of northwest Spain.  This terroir benefits from its proximity to the Mino River and more so, the Atlantic to the west which keeps the temperature cooler in the summer and milder in the winter than inland regions.  While there are five subregions, the Condado do Tea and Val do Salnes tend to produce the best Albarino.

Albarino grape (and wine), for me, is at its very best in the unadulterated form:  unoaked and single variety.  That offers the best of its true expression:  clean, acid driven with lively citrus notes and refreshing minerality.

I am a strong believer of wine and regional food. The heart of Albarino production lies on the northeast Iberian coast, the same region from which the majority fresh seafood such as crab, octopus and scallops is resourced.  The spiny acidity, citrus profile and low alcohol content of Albarino is an ideal match for the sweetness of the seafood whether served whole, as a tapas, or accented with regional spice such as Spanish paprika (pimenton), or lemon, lemongrass or lemon verbena.   With fresh seafood so abundant, it’s easy to dive into a tangy, citrusy dish of cerviche, fish crudo, or fresh lemon accented fish carpaccio of salmon or tuna. It is to die with our Canadian oysters.

Fried foods love clean and refreshing wines to cut through the crust and Albarino is a wonderful pairing wines, especially if you’re looking for dry citrus notes.  Asian dishes such as sushi and richer dishes such as seafood stew, casseroles of chicken, sausage and pork are fun pairings. 

Here is the tasting notes from the albariño that i had at the Oyster festival. It comes from  Adegas/Bodegas Valminor, a modest family winery in the Rias Baixas. They collaborate with 200 winegrowers in the Rias Baixas appellation and they have the latest technology in winemaking equipment. This wine has an excellent price for the quality that delivers and i highly reccomend it for the holidays that are coming

Valminor Albarino 2012 Code SAQ :  11667759. $17.65

Beautiful golden colour. In the nose, intense ripe citric fruit profile wrapped up in a thin foil of minerality. In the mouth, medium body. Very fresh with a tangy acidity. Savoury with a long persistance recalling the  briny flavours of the sea. Perfect match with oysters. 93/100

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